Armand PETERSEN

(1891-1969)

Duck with its beak tucked in the neck

Armand PETERSEN

(1891-1969)

Duck with its beak tucked in the neck

CAPTION

Height : 42 cm - 1' 4¹/₂" in.
Depth : 31 cm - 1' 0¹/₄" in.
Width :24.2 cm - 0' 9¹/₂" in.

LITERATURE

Voir pages 60-61 item 19 of the catalogue raisonné "Petersen Sculpteur animalier", by Liliane Colas.

EXHIBITIONS

Les Artistes Décorateurs in 1930 ; « L’Art animalier à travers les âges » at the Sambon gallery in 1932.

 

DESCRIPTION

Bronze with black patina, signed "A Petersen".  Lost-wax casting by Mario Bisceglia, bears the founder's stamp 
Circa 1930
Born on the 25th of November 1891 in Basel (Switzerland), considered as one of the major French animal sculptors, Armand Petersen entered the Ecole des Arts Industriels in Geneva, where he studied in the goldsmith's and carving class. He spent a few years in Paris to continue his studies before settling for four years in Hungary in the workshop of Bêla Markup who introduced him to modelling. The sculptor led him to discover the animals of the zoological park of Budapest when animal art was in full bloom. His preference for animal sculpture grew as he joined in 1925 the group of Pompon's followers which taught an ad-vivum apprenticeship. He then started to work at the big cat enclosure of the Jardin des Plantes.    

Pompon and Petersen were very quickly compared to one another, and quite rightly so, although the latter stood out for his way of animating his artworks. Always on the alert, his ducks, rabbits and other species seem to be alive from within. The art critic, Yvon Lapaquellerie wrote these few lines about him in the Revue L'Amour de l'Art: " He works the material as if it were gold. Petersen's art has something religious about it, and it is the spirituality with which his work is imbued which gives it a unique character and enables it to stand out from other animal sculptors' production." These terms apply fully to our sculpture, where the duck is captured by the artist in a familiar gesture which enhances the roundness of its volumes. Two copies of this bronze sculpture have been inventoried up to now, one being held in a private collection.

Armand Petersen received many orders from the French State as from foreign States. A great many of his artworks are displayed in national museums, as this 'Hippopotamus', which can be seen at the musée d'Orsay.